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The Two Modules
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The Two Modules Project

I was not happy with the previous diorama project because its design was too complicated. Moreover, the space available under the bed I planned to use is too limited and would not allow easily to place structures on the layout, unless they were stored separately (which would complicate assembly and disassembly) or they were built at a reduced scale (unacceptable).

I then had to find another way. My attention fell on the top of a cupboard, where it is possible to get 120 cm which is the minimum required by a module.

120 cm gives you a fairly good module, but it is still frustrating when you dream of running trains. That’s the moment when your eye meets with Loco Revue number 670, May 2003, page 20, Julian Russell’s O-scale (1/43,5) layout, which he literally ‘folds’ in two, by attaching two modules upside down so that they take less space when stored away. That’s the solution!

The space between the top of the cupboard and the ceiling is around 40 cm, this is enough to store the two modules, provided they are not too wide: let’s settle for 30 cm.

Let’s summarise: two 120 cm—modules put in a row, make a 2.4 m—layout. As soon as they are ‘folded’, it becomes a big box that is 1.2 m long only. Some diagrams for illustration.

The project phases are here.
Last update on
18/03/2006

I have tried to draw a picture of the finished modules. I am not as skilled as Iain Rice but the sketch gives a flavour of it.

The following pictures illustrate the way the modules will be stored away.

First of all, the two modules when attached together:

The left-side module represents the station, typical BA station plan, direct track, passing siding and goods siding along the station structure. Instead of representing a real site, I intend to give the general flavour of it and to gather the main characteristics of the Sologne BA stations (ie. those north of the river Cher). Its name will be La Ferté-St-Denis, which is the combination of La Ferté-Imbault and Selles St-Denis, two existing stations.

The second module will represent the Sologne countryside, including the classical étang (pond), indispensable, visible in the front-right corner.

To store the modules away, it is enough to put one upside down on top of the other and attach them together.

Their construction officially began on October 4. 2003.